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Burlington Speech Clinic, Carrie Rosler, Speech Language Pathologist, Speech Therapist Burlington, Speech Clinic Burlington

Language-Based Learning and Reading Difficulties/Literacy Skills

Whenever a child is struggling with learning to read and write, a speech-language assessment is an essential component of a comprehensive evaluation. We will look closely at their phonological awareness skills, sound-symbol association, reading comprehension and written language. We can develop a treatment plan that will work to enhance all skills needed to improve reading and writing abilities

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have a key role in promoting the emergent literacy skills of all children, and especially those with known or suspected literacy-related learning difficulties. The SLP may help to prevent such problems, identify children at risk for reading and writing difficulties, and provide intervention to remediate literacy-related difficulties.

Parent can help their child to develop literacy skills during regular activities and show children that reading and writing are a part of everyday life and can be fun and enjoyable. Activities for preschool children include the following:

  • Talk to your child and name objects, people, and events in the

  • Talk to your child during daily routine activities such as bath or mealtime and respond to his or her questions.

  • Draw your child's attention to print in everyday settings such as traffic signs, store logos, and food containers.

  • Introduce new vocabulary words during holidays and special activities such as outings to an amusement park, the zoo, the park

  • Engage your child in singing, rhyming games, and nursery rhymes.

  • Read picture and story books that focus on sounds, rhymes, and alliteration (words that start with the same sound, as found in Dr. Seuss

  • Focus your child's attention on books by pointing to words and pictures as you read.

  • Provide a variety of materials to encourage drawing and scribbling (e.g., crayons, paper, markers, finger paints).

  • Encourage your child to describe or tell a story about his/her drawing and write down the words.

For more information visit: www.asha.org

Literacy